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Vision South Pole Expedition

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Vision South Pole has recently formed a partnership with Optical Express and on September 8th, the name of the expedition was changed from ‘Vision South Pole’ to ‘the Optical Express South Pole Challenge’.

And, it doesn’t stop there as the project is also happy to support a third charity, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB).

As a consequence, all donations received after September 8th are now going to be shared between the International Glaucoma Association (IGA), Guide Dogs for the Blind and the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB).

Spokesperson for Optical Express Clare Byatt said, “we are delighted to support Cameron in this expedition and help raise awareness of the importance of eye exams, good vision while carrying out research into human vision. We are also helping raise a lot of money for some great charities, which is definitely an added bonus.”

Dr Cameron Hudson, Guide Dogs and the IGA are delighted to have formed an alliance with Optical Express and the RNIB and we all feel very positive about the future of the expedition.

Cameron is aiming to raise a staggering quarter of a million pounds from his Antarctic adventure, to support the work of Guide Dogs, the GA and the RNIB. But the challenge doesn’t stop here.

He also aims to make British Polar history by carrying out pioneering research into the effects of the 24 hour daylight during the Polar summer on vision, which may help in the development of new treatments for several common visual disorders.

Various awareness campaigns and fundraising activities will be organised between October 2007 and March 2008 in conjunction with the promotion of the challenge to promote eye health around the UK.

You can find more details about them on our website www.glaucoma-association.com or on the official website of the challenge, www.oechallenge.com.

May we to take this opportunity to thank you again for contributing to this project and helping to make a meaningful and significant difference to people with visual disorders.

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